Shalom

Monday: We Need Peace

Peace seems an unlikely treasure in this age of darkness. We say our prayers and cross our fingers in hopes that life will get less chaotic and Light will reign in our lives in the midst of such brokenness. The war between light and dark wages both in our world and in our hearts. 

Luke 7:36-50 tells an impossibly beautiful story about Jesus, some pharisees, and a sinful woman. In this story we find Jesus, the God Incarnate remembered at Christmas, reclined at a table with a group of Pharisees. We learn in these verses that the Pharisees disrespected Jesus openly by not washing his feet nor giving him the customary welcoming kiss. They even went so far as openly mocking him. 

As Jesus is reclining in the midst of such hostility, a woman enters the scene. This woman, shackled by her reputation and sins, came in search of her savior. Seeing him, she stood behind him weeping and washing his feet with her tears and her hair. She kissed them pouring expensive perfume over them.  This woman, steeped in dark sorrow and shame, bares her soul, her income, her reputation at the unclean feet of Jesus. 

Unlike the Pharisees, this woman understood who she was. She recognized the gap between her and God. She understood her depravity. The learned men of the age mocked her calling her “sinner” and proclaiming her brokenness, never once contemplating their lack of faith, their brokenness from The Divine. They ridiculed Jesus for claiming to be a prophet, yet allowing her touch. How could he not see who she truly was?

How did Jesus respond?   

Then he turned toward the woman and said to Simon, ‘Do you see this woman? I came into your house. You did not give me any water for my feet, but she wet my feet with her tears and wiped them with her hair. You did not give me a kiss, but this woman, from the time I entered, has not stopped kissing my feet. You did not put oil on my head, but she has poured perfume on my feet. Therefore, I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven—as her great love has shown. But whoever has been forgiven little loves little.’

Then Jesus said to her, “Your sins are forgiven.”
Jesus said to the woman, “Your faith has saved you; go in peace.”
— Luke 7: 44-48; 50

Your sins are forgiven. 
Your faith has saved you. 
Go. 
In. 
Peace. 

As we look toward Christmas and our Jehovah-Shalom (The Lord is Peace) being born in Bethlehem, we must also look to his life. As we contemplate the Light of the season, we must look to the stories of his ministry. Too many times we read scripture and place ourselves in the roll of the faithful servant or the repentant sinner who understood their brokenness. 

But if we were to truly look at our lives, inspecting our Christmas season, could we really say that were true? Are we not Pharisees openly mocking the Light in our own ways? Where is our repentance in this season?

Instead of hating the people you think are war-makers, hate the appetites and disorder in your own soul, which are the causes of war. If you love peace, then hate injustice, hate tyranny, hate greed - but hate these things in yourself, not in another.
— Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation 

 

Let us go forth, in the recognition of our brokenness, and let us live this season with repentant hearts. Let us fill our lives with the Light, recognizing who this baby we are celebrating truly is. Let us fill our hearts with the acceptance of who we are, breaking our perfume jars and kissing the feet of Jesus.  May we become undignified in our response to our Savior. 

Go in peace, my brothers and sisters. Your sins are forgiven.